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Play It Again Sam – Looking Through HR’s Crystal Ball – Prediction Six of Nine – Talent Mobility and Career Management Strategies

Talent Moving WEBIn the January/February issue of HR Magazine, Josh Bersin with Deloitte, makes nine predictions of “what’s in store for HR in 2015.”   This is part six of a series of nine articles looking at each of these predictions.

While an old classic, this melody has a different tempo than in times past. Managing talent may have been a distant hum in the past as the workforce played a different theme. The theme used to be that workers got a job and stayed put until retirement. However, that theme is reaching a crescendo because the workforce is anything but stable today. The workforce today is much more mobile according to Bersin. We’ve all seen this to be true as both employee and company loyalties have become a requiem. In addition, the younger generation doesn’t seem to crave that gold watch.

On a different note, Bersin suggest that the reason talent management has become so important today is that “…it’s good business. High performing companies around the world have highly tenured people.” This means they have a lot of knowledge about the company, they are skilled, and they have built up productive relationships during their tenure. This is money in the bank. This is true for two reasons. Hiring new people is expensive and it may take years for them to reach the productivity level of a tenured employee. However, there is a word of caution due here.

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Play It Again Sam – Looking Through HR’s Crystal Ball – Prediction Five of Nine – Talent Acquisition

Recuriting WEBIn the January/February issue of HR Magazine, Josh Bersin with Deloitte, makes nine predictions of “what’s in store for HR in 2015.”   This is part five of a series of nine articles looking at each of these predictions.

Networking has a long history beginning around the industrial revolution. Before that, people lived in stable communities and interacted with the same people for most of their lives. They knew approximately 150 people. This number is known as Dunbar’s Number. Its definition is that 150 is “approximately the number of people we are programmed by evolution to know with some reasonably degree of familiarity.” This is according to ChangingMinds.com While networking via social media has not been around quite as long, networking to recruit is a classic tune and always stays at the top of the charts.

When working in human resources departments of hotels a number of years ago, we offered a monetary reward to those employees who brought in someone they knew to apply for a job. If hired, the individual had to stay at work for 90 days and then the incumbent received his or her reward. When going out and about, especially if we ate at a restaurant, we were given cards to give out to someone we thought would be a good addition to our team all the while, singing the praises of our hotel. One networking “tune”, the “old boy network” has probably been around since Adam discovered another male romping around on the planet. So recruiting via networking is certainly not new. The way we do it has a new melody.

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Play It Again Sam – Looking Through HR’s Crystal Ball – Prediction Four of Nine – Corporate Learning

Collab Trg WEBIn the January/February issue of HR Magazine, Josh Bersin with Deloitte, makes nine predictions of “what’s in store for HR in 2015.”   This is part three of a series of articles looking at each of these predictions.Training is another topic with a repeatable tune. However, training often doesn’t get much “air time” as it’s neglected entirely or the first thing to go when the bottom line gets out of tune with profits. In addition, the debate about its value plays like a broken record. But just like the title to Bob Dylan’s song, “The Times They are A-Changin’”

Gone are the days when you went to a training class, listening to the corporate trainer pouring the annual mandatory topic into your brain, while you sat there and passively soaked it in only for it to be forgotten the next day. According to an unscientific poll taken at ATD (formerly ASTD) Techknowledge 2015 on the top concerns in corporate leaning, the melody plays out this way:

Employee engagement 26%
Increasing speed to employee productivity 23%
Tracking quality of learning programs 18%
Personalized learning paths for all employees 17%
Leadership development 16%

According to Deloitte, the concerns around corporate learning are of a different tune and it’s a song that’s being played more and more and its title is technology. A study by Erik Brynjolfson of MIT suggest that due to technology, half of the jobs HR must fill today won’t even be around.in 10 years. Further, jobs are becoming more and more specialized. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to discern that corporate learning or training, as it used to be called, must change with the times.

Another concern is collaborative learning. According to a study with a limited number of participants, not only is collaborative learning growing, but the way to do it is changing as well. Technology, or social learning, is making that more and more possible and affordable. Not only is it affordable, social learning can increase revenues by twice as opposed to organizations that do not use it, according to a study by Human Capital Management. The technology, in turn, spurns another concern. Which technical tools are best for collaborative learning? The top six tools are:

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Play It Again Sam - Looking Through HR's Crystal Ball - Prediction Three of Nine Overwhelmed Employees = Underwhelmed Customers

Overwhlmed-WEB

In the January/February issue of HR Magazine, Josh Bersin with Deloitte, makes nine predictions of “what’s in store for HR in 2015.”   This is part three of a series of articles looking at each of these predictions.

In a recent study, Deloitte states; “…we identified a new human capital issue:…the overwhelmed employee.” Seriously? New? This is not just a tune Sam plays over and over, it’s a choral extravaganza. As one who has sat on both sides of the desk as an employee and being in HR for a number of years, this issue is anything but new. The report goes on to state that organizations are not ready to deal with this issue.

Employers cannot afford to “not be ready to address this issue.” Overwhelmed employees interact with your customers every day. Customers are just like employees, they leave because one person was rude to them. Stress breeds rudeness. While the overwhelmed tune has not changed, the words to that tune or the reasons for employees being overwhelmed has changed over the years.

For example, being overwhelmed used to come from a lack of technology. Now technology is being blamed as one of the contributing factors to stress. According to Deloitte, technology has imbedded changes in recruiting, education, training, analytics, and the way we work. Other contributors are the multi-generational workforce, trying to meet both capitalistic needs and community contributions, and artificial intelligence. Hmmm, mine’s been kinda’ artificial for a while now. OK, moving on… In addition let’s not forget “big data” – don’t get me started. The fact that we can now communicate with ease 24/7/365 only adds to the stress. Indeed employees in some organizations think it a “badge of honor” that a recipient finds their email was answered at 3:35 in the A M. Such activities only lead to burnout. So what can be done about this chorus of employees singing we are overwhelmed?

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Play it Again Sam - Looking Through HR’s Crystal Ball…Prediction Two of Nine

BogartIn the January/February issue of HR Magazine, Josh Bersin with Deloitte, makes nine predictions of “what’s in store for HR in 2015.”  This is part one of a series of articles looking at each of these predictions.

The second prediction in this series is that performance management will be redefined - again, thus the title "Play it Again Sam." Over the decades, performance management has endured or enjoyed, depending on your point of view, changes that have affected the workforce in no small measure.

In 1911 Frederick Taylor came up with the concept of scientific management. This concept came out of his observations of inefficiencies in the steel industry. While this method did improve productivity, the work became monotonous and boring. Where have we heard THAT sung before? Charges arose that work had become dehumanizing and this led to investigations by Congress - no small measure indeed.

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Looking Through HR’s Crystal Ball…Prediction One of Nine

FortuneTeller WEBIn the January/February issue of HR Magazine, Josh Bersin with Deloitte, makes nine predictions of “what’s in store for HR in 2015.” Many of the nine predictions are ongoing hang-overs (pun intended) andDiverse Engaged Team WEB others do have some interesting twists and are the result of a world that continues to spin ever forward on the back of technology, data, and diversity. This will be a series of articles looking at each of these predictions.

Prediction One: Culture, Diversity, Engagement, and Retention

Where have we heard these issues before? Let’s begin with culture. The interesting thing about this prediction is that now culture has become the cousin of your brand. Here’s what happens…people are unhappy in your organization, they leave, driving up turnover costs. Not only that, they tell others why they were unhappy, and all of this gossip, no doubt spread by social media, says your brand is no fun to work for, and you find it difficult to lure people to sign on at your company. Current employees become overwhelmed (another later prediction) from the extra work, they become disgruntled, under produce, give poor customer service, etc., etc., etc.

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Measuring the ROI of Coaching

ROI WEBThere are several reasons to evaluate the validity and ROI of a coaching program.

  • Fiscal responsibility. Coaching comes at a price of not only money, but time and energy. All have a cost to the bottom line.
  • Coming off a tight economy that has not fully recovered. Therefore closer scrutiny and tougher decisions are in order.
  • Since, as this paper mentions, coaching is still beset with doubters, it is essential to prove the effectiveness of coaching to the bottom line.
  • It is imperative to distinguish effective from non-effective coaching

Bearing these essentials in mind, there are many variables and items to measure and these variables are not always numeric. In addition, many coaching experts suggest that only about 5% of coaching programs should be measured in terms of ROI. Further, no two coaching assignments are the same and no two coaches approach coaching from the same perspective. Nevertheless, it is important to review effectiveness and quantify impact of coaching. Ways to help measure coaching consist of evaluating some of the following:

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The Changing Face of Sales

Sales Growth WEBThe sales process is changing from one of being process driven to one of relying on the insight and judgment of the sales representative. Why is this? Today’s customers can now find their own information about products, pricing, quality, and service levels for any industry or product. In other words, the customer is relying less on the sales person to “sell” them on the benefits of goods and services. More than likely, the customer has already sold themselves before they ever enter a store, showroom or sales event. Therefore, the sales professional requires less adherence to protocols, inspection, direction, and structure. What is needed is more guidance and support from managers. This fact alone demands a coaching platform. There are, however, considerations to examine.

Many managers lack coaching skills. Outside coaches can be brought in to achieve the task and this works well as a successful coaching relationship does not require years of having an established relationship, but rather trust is the key. Once trust is established and the coach and coachee feel they work well together, then great progress is achievable. In addition, it is wise to be sure a coach has good credentials.

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